Local Authors

The Greatest Book You'll Ever Read or Maybe Not

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The Gulch Jumpers

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The Harlot's Tale

The Harlot's Tale

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It is August, 1645, one year since York fell into Puritan hands. As the city suffers through a brutal summer heat, Bridget Hodgson and Martha Hawkins are drawn into a murder investigation more frightening than their last. In order to appease God's wrath--and end the heat-wave--the city's overlords have launched a brutal campaign to whip the city's sinners into godliness. But for someone in York, this is not enough. First a prostitute and her client are found stabbed to death, then a pair of adulterers are beaten and strangled. York's sinners have been targeted for execution.

Bridget and Martha--assisted once again by Will, Bridget's good-hearted nephew--race to find the killer even as he adds more bodies to his tally. The list of suspects is long: Hezekiah Ward, a fire and brimstone preacher new to York; Ward's son, Praise-God, whose intensity mirrors his father's; John Stubb, one of Ward's fanatic followers, whose taste for blood may not have been sated by his time in Parliament's armies. Or could the killer be closer to home? Will's brother Joseph is no stranger to death, and he shares the Wards' dreams of driving sin from the city.

To find the killer, Bridget, Martha, and Will must uncover the city's most secret sins, and hope against hope that the killer does not turn his attention in their direction, in The Harlot's Tale by Sam Thomas.

The Heart is a Tree Cut Down

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The Heart Wants

The Heart Wants

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The Ideal, Genuine Man (1st edition)

The Ideal, Genuine Man (1st edition)

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Don Robertson was a true Clevelander. He was born and raised in Cleveland, and after stints in the Army and one year at Harvard, he returned to Cleveland and attended Case Western Reserve University for one year. He then became a reporter and columnist for The Plain Dealer (1950-1955 and 1963-1966), The Cleveland News (1957–1959), and The Cleveland Press (1968–1982). He wrote 18 published novels, most of which took place in Cleveland and the fictional town of Paradise Falls, Ohio. Robertson is probably best known for his trio of novels featuring Morris Bird III: The Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread (1965), The Sum and Total of Now (1966), and The Greatest Thing That Almost Happened (1970).

Stephen King was a big fan of Don Robertson, and he acknowledged that Robertson was one of his influences. In 1987, King published Robertson's novel The Ideal, Genuine Man through his Philtrum Press. In this later novel, Robertson tells the story of Herman Marshall, a retired truck driver who tries to cope with his wife's cancer and his own feelings of growing old.

1st edition; inscribed by author; dust jacket suffers some minor scrapes. VG/VG


The Letter from Sweet Abundance

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The Making of Cleveland's Black Suburb in the City: Lee-Seville & Lee-Harvard

The Making of Cleveland's Black Suburb in the City: Lee-Seville & Lee-Harvard

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Hear Dr. Todd Michney and Kathleen Crowther discuss this book and the historic Lee-Harvard area on the Lines of Loganberry podcast on Spotify.

Our story starts just west of the intersection of Lee and Seville Roads, where a Black enclave took shape in the 1920s. By establishing a foothold in Cleveland's far southeastern reaches, African Americans laid the successful groundwork for this vicinity to develop as a Black "suburb in the city." This book, the first-ever published history of these neighborhoods, documents and celebrates a success story, a Cleveland case of Black community-building. The making of Lee-Seville and Lee-Harvard unfolded under remarkable circumstances and against considerable odds, thereby offering an instructive example of the life possibilities that some Black Americans in earlier generations were able to create at the city's outskirts.The Cleveland Restoration Society, a regional historic preservation non-profit, has worked for the past several years collecting community history, interviewing and filming residents of the neighborhood and scouring archives and private collections for historical images that help tell the story of this remarkable place.

The Manners Playbook

The Manners Playbook

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The media stereotypes Black boys as dangerous and lacking discipline and etiquette. But in fact, they are descendants of Kings and Queens and should feel proud of where they came from and where they're going. However, navigating from one world to another-like boyhood to manhood-can be disorienting and uncomfortable. It doesn't have to be so uncomfortable, though. James B. Wingo's The Manners Playbook: Essential Lessons for Young African-American Boys on Self-Awareness, Confidence and Etiquette is full of guidance on approaching new situations, caring for the body, and being confident in one's self while practicing good etiquette in new situations and relationships. Worried about a first date? Wondering how to handle a fight with friends? Want to impress someone? Wingo has tips for all and more in his guide to living up to the person you are meant to be.

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The Marrow of Tradition

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On November 10, 1898, a mob of 400 rampages through the streets of Wilmington, North Carolina, killing as many as 60 citizens, burning down the newspaper office, overthrowing the newly elected leaders, and installing a new white supremacist government. The Wilmington Race Riots--also known as the Wilmington Insurrection and the Wilmington Massacre, is the only coup d'etat on American soil. The violence was prompted by the increasing political powers African Americans in the town were gaining during Reconstruction. The Marrow of Tradition is a fictionalized account of this important, under-studied event. Charles W. Chesnutt, an African American writer from North Carolina who lived in Cleveland as an adult and was the first black professional writer in the nation, narrates the story of "Wellington" North Carolina through William Miller, a black doctor, and his wife, Janet, who is both black and the unclaimed daughter of a prominent white businessman. Along with dozens of other characters, including a black domestic servant whose speech is rendered in vernacular dialect, they create a composite of Reconstruction and the violent racial politics created in backlash. The novel is also a masterful work of art that stands on its own: gripping, nuanced, and wholly original.