Cleveland & Ohio

Cleveland Beer : History and Revival in the Rust Belt

Cleveland Beer : History and Revival in the Rust Belt

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Cleveland loves its craft beer. The city's breweries are flourishing under a period of brewing renewal and an insatiable taste for quality local craftsmanship. But Cleveland's brewing industry hasn't always enjoyed such prosperous times. The industry boomed during the 1800s only to see Prohibition, dwindling demand and increased competition stifle production. Each brewery, one by one, closed its doors until none remained. In 1988, Patrick and Daniel Conway opened the fledgling Great Lakes Brewing Company, and the industry was born anew. Today, local visionaries are engineering the comeback and bringing national attention to Cleveland's award-winning craft brews. Authors Leslie Basalla and Peter Chakerian chart the remarkable history of the ups and downs of Cleveland beer.
Cleveland Goes Modern : Design for the Home, 1930-1970

Cleveland Goes Modern : Design for the Home, 1930-1970

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Midcentury Modern domestic architecture in Northeast Ohio

"The definitive study of its subject."--Alice T. Friedman, Wellesley College

Based on the award-winning exhibition of the same name, Cleveland Goes Modern: Design for the Home, 1930-1970, examines Modern movement houses in greater Cleveland within the context of American Modernism as a whole. The authors demonstrate that understanding and contextualizing this regional domestic architecture, along with the practitioners and clients who created it, makes a valuable contribution to the larger study of architecture and the Modern period as well as of the region's architectural history.

Beautifully illustrated with more than 150 drawings and photographs in color and black-and-white, the book features the work of six architects: Don Hisaka, John Terence Kelly, Robert Little, William Morris, Ernst Payer, and Fred Toguchi. In their own words, the architects, clients, and restorers discuss the homes they created and preserved. Cleveland Goes Modern also documents other modernists who practiced during this period and the role they played. It examines how the modernist sensibility and tradition survives and thrives in national and local twenty-first-century architects. Functioning as both a historical overview and a gazetteer of significant examples, Cleveland Goes Modern makes a compelling case for preserving the works of architecture from the period.

Some of the homes featured in the book have been torn down since the project began; others may be altered or disappear in the future. Cleveland Goes Modern makes a lasting contribution to the study of architecture, one that will serve students and scholars of architectural history for generations after these singular structures no longer exist.

Cleveland Grand Prix : An American Show Jumping First

Cleveland Grand Prix : An American Show Jumping First

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Home to inventors of the first automobile, airplane and professional baseball team, Ohio is also the birthplace of the first horse show jumping grand prix in the Western Hemisphere. Longtime fans can relive the exciting victories of some of the finest horses and riders in history, while newcomers can experience the Cleveland Grand Prix's glory years as the premier summer social tradition for thousands of spectators. From harness racing to fox hunting, saddle up with equestrian authority Betty Weibel as she explains how this picturesque corner of the Chagrin Valley grew into a world-class horse sport hub.
Cleveland Heights

Cleveland Heights

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An interesting history of Cleveland Heights, from its hamlet beginnings to its present-day suburbia.


During its more than a century as a Cleveland suburb, Cleveland Heights has been shaped by the natural topography, technology, enterprising developers, elected officials, and its residents of many backgrounds. The result has been a rich mosaic of places and people. In the 1890s, wealthy Clevelanders began to leave the city's smoky factories and congested neighborhoods for the "heights" in East Cleveland Township. In 1901, the heights became the hamlet of Cleveland Heights. As its population changed, so did the suburb's homes, shops, schools, parks, and places of worship. Today, Cleveland Heights is as diversified as its citizens, its eclectic architecture and neighborhoods, and its unique history.

Cleveland in World War II

Cleveland in World War II

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Berthed on the Cleveland lakefront, the battle-hardened submarine USS Cod serves as a proud reminder of the wartime contributions from the Greater Cleveland community. Clevelanders did their duty and more, from round-the-clock work on the factory assembly lines to the four Medal of Honor recipients on the front lines. The Cleveland Bomber Plant churned out thousands of B-29 parts, while Auto-Ordnance Co. developed the design for the Thompson submachine guns used by GIs on nearly every battlefield. Indians pitcher Bob Feller left the game to go into the service, and Clarence Jamison flew with the famed Tuskegee Airmen. Through interviews and archival material, authors Brian Albrecht and James Banks honor a time when Clevelanders of all stripes answered the call to arms.

Cleveland is a Wild, Woolly Place

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Cleveland Summertime Memories : A Warm Look Back

Cleveland Summertime Memories : A Warm Look Back

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What made the summertime special when growing up in Cleveland? The final school bell has rung, so put on your shades, slather on the sunscreen, and relive some of your fondest memories ...

Taking a dip at the city pool with your best friends. Building a sandcastle in your clam diggers at Edgewater Park. Pulling up to Manners Big Boy in your parents' car for a burger and a Big Ghoulardi. Cooling off with a ornate sundae at Boukair's near the Palace Theatre. Watching the Indians lose (again) but being dazzled by the fireworks at Municipal Stadium. Riding the Rocket Ship and then being terrified by Laughing Sal at Euclid Beach Park. Packing a picnic for the first season at Blossom.

Enjoy stories told by dozens of Northeast Ohioians who shared in the same fun and excitement of growing up in the Cleveland area.

Look inside and rediscover some of your own Cleveland summertime memories!

Cleveland's Colorful Characters

Cleveland's Colorful Characters

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"Cleveland's Colorful Characters" is an easy to read, insightful book on some of Cleveland's most influential individuals. These individuals helped create the grand and unique city which at one time was one of the most respected cities in the word. The first chapter is on the Mather family and how they helped create many of Cleveland's world class institutions. On a lighter side they were the first documented individuals to throw a 'toga party'.

The 2nd chapter provides insights into the Van Sweringens who built many of Cleveland's finest homes and buildings as well as being the largest railroad owners in the country. Through the author's research he was able to determine they were the bases for the book, The Great Gatsby.

The 3rd chapter concerns Jim Backus who was the creator of Mr. Magoo as well as the millionaire on Gilligan's Island. He attended University school and great up in Bratenahl. Local lore states Mr. Magoo was based on a University School teacher.

The other chapters inform readers on Charles Schweinfurth, aka "Cleveland's Castle Creator", a brief insight into Camp Cleveland a 20,000 person Civil War camp in University Heights, unusual ghost stories and the last three chapters are dedicated to Cleveland's automotive history. This is when Cleveland was the car capital of the country, if not the world.

Much of the intriguing information in this fact-packed book is new information which the author derived from his in-depth research and conversations with family descendants of those depicted in the book.

Cleveland's Cultural Gardens

Cleveland's Cultural Gardens

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Honoring and embodying the cultural heritages of a region through the beauty of shared outdoor spaces

From their beginnings as private farmland to their current form as monuments to cultural and ethnic diversity, the unique collection of landscaped, themed gardens that compose Cleveland's Cultural Gardens holds a rich history. John J. Grabowski guides readers through this story, using both archival images and Lauren R. Pacini's stunning contemporary photography to illustrate their development and importance. The effect is a comprehensive view of the factors that made the Cultural Gardens possible, from Cleveland's geographical features to international conflicts. First erected as the Shakespeare Garden in 1916, the land bordering Doan Brook slowly began to incorporate tributes to immigrants, reflecting Cleveland's role as a key location for eastern European immigrants. Through this chronicle of the gardens' changing landscapes, Grabowski shapes a gripping narrative of shifting attitudes toward immigration, both locally and nationally. Throughout both world wars, the Cold War, and more recent events, the gardens' composition has changed to reflect more diversity, now encompassing 33 individual gardens that honor cultures and countries with connections to Cleveland. Today, each garden features plants native to the corresponding culture, from German to Vietnamese and from Ethiopian to Finnish. This vast cultural inclusivity makes Cleveland's Cultural Gardens a forerunner in the push for greater representation of cultures and people of color in memorials and public spaces. The gardens also highlight a growing emphasis on collaboration and coexistence among cultures, as symbolized in the Peace Garden of the Nations and its crypt of intermingled soil from historic shrines around the world. This book will be of interest to field specialists and nonexperts alike for its excellent illustrations and for its discussion of culture, inclusion, and diversity both on a local and national scale.

Cleveland's Millionaires' Row

Cleveland's Millionaires' Row

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The incredible affluence and extravagance of Euclid Avenue's Millionaires' Row have fascinated Clevelanders for more than a century. Within these stately mansions, US presidents enjoyed dinners and discussions with powerful politicians and influential ind