Sociology

I Love You Always: One Family's Alzheimer's/Dementia Journey and the Lessons Learned Along the Way

I Love You Always: One Family's Alzheimer's/Dementia Journey and the Lessons Learned Along the Way

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Caring for someone who has Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia is a daunting task that can leave most caregivers drained, strained, and depressed. Many find comfort in knowing they are not alone and in being able to share their experiences with someone who understands what they are going through. They want assurance that it's normal to "lose it" occasionally and that feeling "less than" is common. Caregivers need all the support and tools they can garner to help them survive this experience. Such was the reason for writing "I Love You Always," which is an honest account of one family's experiences from diagnosis and beyond.Lottie has survived seemingly insurmountable tragedies in her life, emerging stronger after each one. When she is diagnosed with Alzheimer's and vascular dementia, at the age of eighty, she becomes determined to live until ninety, longer than anyone in her immediate family. Her children join forces to help Lottie reach her goal while ensuring she remains in her beloved home. I Love You Always is her daughter LaBena's account of their tumultuous journey, sharing practical tips for caregivers, as well as the lessons of love, laughter, and faith that were learned along the way.You are not alone and the more we share our stories, the more people will understand. May there soon be a cure!
Listeners: A History of Wiretapping in the United States

Listeners: A History of Wiretapping in the United States

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They've been listening for longer than you think. A new history reveals how--and why.

Wiretapping is nearly as old as electronic communications. Telegraph operators intercepted enemy messages during the Civil War. Law enforcement agencies were listening to private telephone calls as early as 1895. Communications firms have assisted government eavesdropping programs since the early twentieth century--and they have spied on their own customers too. Such breaches of privacy once provoked outrage, but today most Americans have resigned themselves to constant electronic monitoring. How did we get from there to here?

In The Listeners, Brian Hochman shows how the wiretap evolved from a specialized intelligence-gathering tool to a mundane fact of life. He explores the origins of wiretapping in military campaigns and criminal confidence games and tracks the use of telephone taps in the US government's wars on alcohol, communism, terrorism, and crime. While high-profile eavesdropping scandals fueled public debates about national security, crime control, and the rights and liberties of individuals, wiretapping became a routine surveillance tactic for private businesses and police agencies alike.

From wayward lovers to foreign spies, from private detectives to public officials, and from the silver screen to the Supreme Court, The Listeners traces the long and surprising history of wiretapping and electronic eavesdropping in the United States. Along the way, Brian Hochman considers how earlier generations of Americans confronted threats to privacy that now seem more urgent than ever.

PALACES FOR THE PEOPLE

PALACES FOR THE PEOPLE

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"A comprehensive, entertaining, and compelling argument for how rebuilding social infrastructure can help heal divisions in our society and move us forward."--Jon Stewart

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY NPR - "Engaging."--Mayor Pete Buttigieg, The New York Times Book Review (Editors' Choice)

We are living in a time of deep divisions. Americans are sorting themselves along racial, religious, and cultural lines, leading to a level of polarization that the country hasn't seen since the Civil War. Pundits and politicians are calling for us to come together and find common purpose. But how, exactly, can this be done?

In Palaces for the People, Eric Klinenberg suggests a way forward. He believes that the future of democratic societies rests not simply on shared values but on shared spaces: the libraries, childcare centers, churches, and parks where crucial connections are formed. Interweaving his own research with examples from around the globe, Klinenberg shows how "social infrastructure" is helping to solve some of our most pressing societal challenges. Richly reported and ultimately uplifting, Palaces for the People offers a blueprint for bridging our seemingly unbridgeable divides.

LONGLISTED FOR THE ANDREW CARNEGIE MEDAL FOR EXCELLENCE IN NONFICTION

"Just brilliant!"--Roman Mars, 99% Invisible

"The aim of this sweeping work is to popularize the notion of 'social infrastructure'--the 'physical places and organizations that shape the way people interact'. . . . Here, drawing on research in urban planning, behavioral economics, and environmental psychology, as well as on his own fieldwork from around the world, [Eric Klinenberg] posits that a community's resilience correlates strongly with the robustness of its social infrastructure. The numerous case studies add up to a plea for more investment in the spaces and institutions (parks, libraries, childcare centers) that foster mutual support in civic life."--The New Yorker

"Palaces for the People--the title is taken from the Scottish-American industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie's description of the hundreds of libraries he funded--is essentially a calm, lucid exposition of a centuries-old idea, which is really a furious call to action."--New Statesman

"Clear-eyed . . . fascinating."--Psychology Today

Red Menace: How Lipstick Changed the Face of American History

Red Menace: How Lipstick Changed the Face of American History

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In America, lipstick is the foundation of empires; it's a signature of identity; it's propaganda, self-expression, oppression, freedom, and rebellion. It's a multi-billion-dollar industry and one of our most iconic accessories of gender. This engaging and entertaining history of lipstick from the colonies to the present will give readers a new view of the little tube's big place in modern America from defining the middle class to building Fortune 500 businesses to being present at Stonewall and being engineered for space travel. Lipstick has served as both a witness and a catalyst to history; it went to war with women, it gave women of color previously unheard-of business opportunities, and was part of the development of celebrity and mass media. In the Twentieth Century alone, lipstick evolved from a beauty secret for a select few to a required essential for well turned-out women but also a mark of rock 'n' roll rebellion and a political statement. How has this mainstay of the makeup kit remained relevant for over a century? Beauty journalist Ilise S. Carter suggests that it's because the simple lipstick says a lot. From the provocative allure of a classic red lip to the powerful statement of drag, the American love affair with lipstick is linked to every aspect of our experience of gender, from venturing into the working world or running for the presidency. The Red Menace will capture all of those dimensions, with a dishy dose of fabulosity that makes it a must-read for lipstick's fiercest disciples, its harshest critics, and everyone in between.

Send a Runner: A Navajo Honors the Long Walk

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Society in America (Rare 1837 publication!)

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Scarce 3-volume set of British author Harriet Martineau's comprehensive study of American society undertaken during a two-year visit, 1834-1836. Her work encompasses politics, economics, and civilization, including the role of women in society. Martineau was a vocal opponent of slavery, and this important publication is a fascinating glimpse into a still-divided America during this time period. She even delves into the prevalence of dueling in the U.S., citing the Hamilton-Burr duel as an unfortunate example.

Text is clean and bright; volumes are disbound. Original boards, with remnants of original spine labels visible on each volume. Signature of previous owner, English Unitarian minister Samuel Bache (1804-1876). Housed in custom-made clamshell box. End papers and title pages foxed. G-

Text Me When You Get Home

Text Me When You Get Home

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"Text Me has the thrills and laughs of a romantic comedy, but with an inverted message: 'There just isn't only one love story in our lives, ' Schaefer writes. If you're lucky, friends will be the protagonists in these multiple love stories. It's high time that we start seeing it that way."--NPR.org

A personal and sociological examination--and ultimately a celebration--of the evolution of female friendship in pop culture and modern society


For too long, women have been told that we are terrible at being friends, that we can't help being cruel or competitive, or that we inevitably abandon each other for romantic partners. But we are rejecting those stereotypes and reclaiming the power of female friendship.

In Text Me When You Get Home, journalist Kayleen Schaefer interviews more than one hundred women about their BFFs, soulmates, girl gangs, and queens while tracing this cultural shift through the lens of pop culture. Our love for each other is reflected in Abbi and Ilana, Issa and Molly, #squadgoals, the acclaim of Girls Trip and Big Little Lies, and Galentine's Day.

Schaefer also includes her own history of grappling with a world that told her to rely on men before she realized that her true source of support came from a strong tribe of women. Her personal narrative and celebration of her own relationships weaves throughout the evolution of female friendship on-screen, a serious look at how women have come to value one another and our relationships.

Text Me When You Get Home is a validation that has never existed before. A thoughtful, heart-soaring, deeply reported look at how women are taking a stand for their friendships and not letting go.

The Color of Law

The Color of Law

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In this groundbreaking history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America's cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation--that is, through individual prejudices, income differences, or the actions of private institutions like banks and real estate agencies. Rather, The Color of Law incontrovertibly makes clear that it was de jure segregation--the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments--that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day.

Through extraordinary revelations and extensive research that Ta-Nehisi Coates has lauded as "brilliant" (The Atlantic), Rothstein comes to chronicle nothing less than an untold story that begins in the 1920s, showing how this process of de jure segregation began with explicit racial zoning, as millions of African Americans moved in a great historical migration from the south to the north.

As Jane Jacobs established in her classic The Death and Life of Great American Cities, it was the deeply flawed urban planning of the 1950s that created many of the impoverished neighborhoods we know. Now, Rothstein expands our understanding of this history, showing how government policies led to the creation of officially segregated public housing and the demolition of previously integrated neighborhoods. While urban areas rapidly deteriorated, the great American suburbanization of the post-World War II years was spurred on by federal subsidies for builders on the condition that no homes be sold to African Americans. Finally, Rothstein shows how police and prosecutors brutally upheld these standards by supporting violent resistance to black families in white neighborhoods.

The Fair Housing Act of 1968 prohibited future discrimination but did nothing to reverse residential patterns that had become deeply embedded. Yet recent outbursts of violence in cities like Baltimore, Ferguson, and Minneapolis show us precisely how the legacy of these earlier eras contributes to persistent racial unrest. "The American landscape will never look the same to readers of this important book" (Sherrilyn Ifill, president of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund), as Rothstein's invaluable examination shows that only by relearning this history can we finally pave the way for the nation to remedy its unconstitutional past.

What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia

What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia

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"The most damning critique of Hillbilly Elegy."―The New York Review of Books


"A spiky polemic."--Benjamin Wallace-Wells, The New Yorker


In recent years and in countless ways, Appalachia has been portrayed as ground zero for America's "forgotten tribe" of white, working-class people--in short, it's "Trump Country." And during the Trump Era, demystifying the region to explain its roots of dysfunction became a national industry, made most popular by J. D. Vance's Hillbilly Elegy. But these assessments have only given us a skewed portrait of a region that is actually marked by racial diversity, a storied labor history, and people who fall on all sides of the political spectrum. In What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia, Elizabeth Catte offers her clear-eyed and uncompromising assessment of America's historical tendency to stereotype Appalachia's people and problems. It's a frank and ferocious insider's perspective that will complicate and illuminate your ideas about one of America's most misunderstood regions.
Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?

Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?

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The classic, New York Times-bestselling book on the psychology of racism that shows us how to talk about race in America.

Walk into any racially mixed high school and you will see Black, White, and Latino youth clustered in their own groups. Is this self-segregation a problem to address or a coping strategy? How can we get past our reluctance to discuss racial issues?

Beverly Daniel Tatum, a renowned authority on the psychology of racism, argues that straight talk about our racial identities is essential if we are serious about communicating across racial and ethnic divides and pursuing antiracism. These topics have only become more urgent as the national conversation about race is increasingly acrimonious. This fully revised edition is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand dynamics of race and racial inequality in America.