"D" is for Deadbeat

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He called himself Alvin Limardo, and the job he had for Kinsey was cut-and-dried: locate a kid who'd done him a favor and pass on a check for $25,000. It was only later, after he'd stiffed her for her retainer, that Kinsey found out his name was Daggett. John Daggett. Ex-con. Inveterate liar. Chronic drunk. And dead. The cops called it an accident--death by drowning. Kinsey wasn't so sure.

Pulled into the detritus of a dead man's life, Kinsey soon realizes that Daggett had an awful lot of enemies. There's the daughter who grew up with a cheating drunk for a father, and the wife who's become a religious nut in response to an intolerable marriage. There's the lady who thought she was Mrs. Daggett--and has the bruises to prove it--only to discover the legal Mrs. D. And there are the drug dealers out $25,000. But most of all, there are the families of the five people John Daggett killed, victims of his wild, drunken driving. The D.A. called it vehicular manslaughter and put him away for two years. The families called it murder and had very good reason to want John Daggett dead.

Deft, cunning, and clever, this latest Millhone mystery also confronts some messy truths, for, as Kinsey herself says, "Some debts of the human soul are so enormous only life itself is sufficient forfeit"--but as she'd be the first to admit, murder is not a socially acceptable solution.

1st edition, 1st printing, ex-lib; dust jacket in protective cover. G/G

5000 Nights at the Opera

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Sir Rudolf Bing was the General Manager of the Metropolitan Opera for 22 years (1950-72). The New York Times called this book "a witty, arrogant, forthright memoir." (NYT, October 22, 2972)

1st edition. Inscribed by author. Dust jacket in protective mylar cover; spine has some wear and chipping; dark red cloth with gilt lettering on cover and spine; deckled edges; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/G

84, Charing Cross Road

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This charming classic love story, first published in 1970, brings together twenty years of correspondence between Helene Hanff, at the time, a freelance writer living in New York City, and a used-book dealer in London at 84, Charing Cross Road. Through the years, though never meeting and separated both geographically and culturally, they share a winsome, sentimental friendship based on their common love for books. Their relationship, captured so acutely in these letters, is one that has touched the hearts of thousands of readers around the world.

New York: Grossman Publishing, 1970. 4th printing. Dust jacket in protective cover; cover shows signs of wear, lightly soiled, rubbed, spine chipped and faded; red cloth with design in black showing air mail stamps and dates on front; lettering on spine in black and white; binding tight; text clean. G+/G

A Death in Belmont (Signed 1st edition)

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In the spring of 1963, the quiet suburb of Belmont, Massachusetts, is rocked by a shocking sex murder that exactly fits the pattern of the Boston Strangler. Sensing a break in the case that has paralyzed the city of Boston, the police track down a black man, Roy Smith, who cleaned the victim's house that day and left a receipt with his name on the kitchen counter. Smith is hastily convicted of the Belmont murder, but the terror of the Strangler continues.

On the day of the murder, Albert DeSalvo—the man who would eventually confess in lurid detail to the Strangler's crimes—is also in Belmont, working as a carpenter at the Jungers' home. In this spare, powerful narrative, Sebastian Junger chronicles three lives that collide—and ultimately are destroyed—in the vortex of one of the first and most controversial serial murder cases in America.

1st edition; inscribed by author; dust jacket near fine; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG+/VG+

A Thousand And One Afternoons In Chicago

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In 1921, Ben Hecht began writing a daily column for the Chicago Daily News, called "1001 Afternoons in Chicago," which were fictive sketches of Chicago’s bustling urban landscape of that time. A year later, 64 of these columns were compiled in a book with the same title.The columns in 1,001 Afternoons in Chicago are scruffy time capsules of an earlier Chicago, an era that is long gone but still recognizable to readers' imaginations. Michigan Avenue, Lake Michigan, street names such as Dearborn and Adams and LaSalle and Wabansia, places such as the Art Institute of Chicago—they're all here, sprinkled amid Hecht's nervous little haikus of urban life. He calls Chicago ‘a razzle-dazzle of dreams, tragedies, fantasies,’ and his tales capture gorgeous scraps of it, vivid vignettes starring businessmen and hobos and cops and socialites and janitors.

Covici-McGee Publishers, Chicago, 1922; 1st edition; illustrated paper covers; spine worn and creased, missing 3" from top; text clean. G-

A Woman Intervenes, or The Mistress of the Mine

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Robert Barr (16 September 1849 – 21 October 1912) was a Scottish-Canadian short story writer and novelist, born in Glasgow, Scotland. He emigrated with his parents to Upper Canada at age four and was educated in Toronto at Toronto Normal School. Barr became a teacher and eventual headmaster of the Central School of Windsor, Ontario. While he had that job he began to contribute short stories—often based on personal experiences—to the Detroit Free Press. In 1876 Barr quit his teaching position to become a staff member of that publication, in which his contributions were published with the pseudonym "Luke Sharp." Hal Hurst (1865–1938), illustrator, was an English painter, etcher, miniaturist, illustrator and founding member of the Royal Miniature Society.

New York and London: Frederick A. Stokes Company, 1896. 1st ed.; profusely illustrated by Hal Hurst. No dust jacket; tan cloth with pick-axe design in brown, silver, and blue on cover; spine darkened; spine edges frayed; corners bumped; covers lightly soiled; former owner's bookplate on pastedown; front hinge weak; text clean. G-

A World of Love

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Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973) was an Irish-British novelist and short story writer, known for her depictions of life during wartime. In A World of Love, an uneasy group of relations are living under one roof at Montefort, a decaying manor in the Irish countryside. When twenty-year-old Jane finds in the attic a packet of love letters written years ago by Guy, her mother’s one-time fiance who died in World War I, the discovery has explosive repercussions. It is not clear to whom the letters are addressed, and their appearance begins to lay bare the strange and unspoken connections between the adults now living in the house. Soon, a girl on the brink of womanhood, a mother haunted by love lost, and a ruined matchmaker with her own claim on the dead wage a battle that makes the ghostly Guy as real a presence in Montefort as any of the living.

New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1955. 1st edition. Dust jacket in protective cover; spine edges chipped; corners chipped; top of flaps tanned; green cloth with red and blue design and lettering on cover and spine; deckled edges; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/G+

A Yankee Should Never Be Black (Signed 1st edition)

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Bascom Books, NY, 1973.  Signed by author.  VG/VG

Afterthought: Pieces About Writing

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Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973) was an Irish-British novelist and short story writer, known for her depictions of life during wartime London. She also wrote nonfiction essays, and this collection of reviews, prefaces, articles, and broadcasts is an astonishing display of the scope of Elizabeth Bowen's art.

London: Longmans, 1962. 1st edition. Dust jacket in protective cover; bottom corner of front flap clipped; head of spine and top corners chipped; maroon cloth with gilt lettering on spine; endpapers clean; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/VG-

Age of Anxiety: A Baroque Eclogue

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W. H. Auden's last, longest, and most ambitious book-length poem won the Pulitzer Prize and inspired a symphony by Leonard Bernstein as well as a ballet by Jerome Robbins.

New York: Random House, 1947. 1st printing. Dust jacket in protective mylar cover; 1/2" at top of spine missing; 1" tear at top left cover; corners chipped; front cover has some soiling in spots; dark green cloth with gilt lettering over maroon on spine; first 8 pages creased at top left; binding tight. G/G-

Age of Wonders

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“A marvelous and disturbing book . . . an experience both painful and joyous.”―Times Literary Supplement

The secure world of a well-established and apparently perfectly assimilated Jewish writer living in an Austrian town before World War II, disintegrates under the force of political and social realities that daily sanctify the old and endemic Austrian anti-Semitism. We learn what we learn through Bruno, the thirteen-year-old son of the family, whose spare and uninflected account discloses the slow onset of disaster. His father, a successful Austrian intellectual, refuses the implications of what’s happening and embraces the humiliating routines of Jewish self-hatred. To the vicious attacks on his writing and character, he adds his own voice until, with nothing left―not faith, not family, not dignity―he disappears. Thirty years later, the war long over, Bruno, at a low point in a childless marriage, responds to ambiguously positive inquiries about his father’s work, and travels from his home in Jerusalem to the Austrian town of his childhood. What he encounters in that town, “now clean of Jews,” means something more than confronting his own profound losses.

1st English edition; translated by Dalya Bilu. Signed by author in Hebrew. Embossed on endpaper "From the Library of David S. Ariel." Dust jacket in protective mylar cover. VG/VG

Albert (Signed 1st edition)

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Philadelphia: Dorrance & Company, 1970. 1st edition, inscribed by the author on ffep; dust jacket in protective cover; head of spine has 1/2" tear; rear cover has 2" tear at bottom; evidence of repairs made with scotch tape; brown cloth with black lettering on spine; binding good; text clean and bright. VG/G-

An Eye for An Eye

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Leigh Brackett (1915-1978) was an American writer, particularly of science fiction; she has been referred to as the "Queen of Space Opera." She was also a screenwriter and a writer of crime fiction. An Eye for an Eye has been called a novel of nightmare revenge, and it was adapted for television as Suspicion series episode in 1958.

1st edition; published for the Crime Club by Doubleday & Company; "A Crime Club selection." Dust jacket in protective mylar cover; 1/2" tear at head of spine and top of front cover; price clipped; black boards with red decoration and lettering on spine; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/G+

Anabasis, a poem translated by T.S. Eliot

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St.-John Perse's great poem "Anabasis" was first published in France in 1924. It was translated six years later by T. S. Eliot for a British limited edition. After a leisurely fourteen-year percolation, it was brought out in America in 1938. This first U.S. edition has a dust jacket in protective cover; 1" tear on rear cover; ink notes on rear cover; black cloth; endpapers tanned. G+/G

Animal Dreams (USED)

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Asphalt Jungle

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William Riley (W.R.) Burnett (1899-1982) was an American novelist and screenwriter, best known for his crime novel Little Caesar, the film adaptation of which was considered to be the first of the classic American gangster movies. Burnett's characters exist in a world of twilight morality — virtue can come from gangsters and criminals, malice from guardians and protectors. Above all his characters are human and this could be their undoing. In The Asphalt Jungle, published in 1949 and made into a movie in 1950, the most perfectly masterminded plot falls apart as each character reveals a weakness.


1st UK edition, published by Macdonald & Company, London, 1950; dust jacket in protective mylar cover; top edge shelf-worn; black cloth with gilt lettering on spine; endpapers very lightly tanned; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/VG

Audrey Hepburn's Neck

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Offering a unique perspective and unusual insight into modern Japan and its wartime past, Audrey Hepburn's Neck is also a shrewd study of cross-cultural obsessions, and of erotic, romantic and familial love.
The American author Alan Brown crosses both racial and cultural lines to tell his story through the eyes of a young, handsome Japanese cartoonist, Toshiyuki ("Toshi") Okamoto, who traces his strong attraction to Western women bock to his ninth birthday, when his mother took him to see Audrey Hepburn in the movie "Roman Holiday."


Leaving behind a sad, silent childhood -- which was spent living in two rooms above the family noodle shop on an isolated peninsula in the far north of Japan -- Toshi moves to Tokyo to pursue his career. There he falls under the spell of three Americans: his best friend and confidante, the generous and extroverted Paul, a gay advertising copywriter who has plenty of his romantic mishaps with Japanese men; Jane, his glamorous but emotionally unstable teacher at the Very Romantic English Academy, with whom Toshi has a hazardous sexual affair; and, finally, the lovely and talented composer, Lucy, with whom Toshi falls in love.


The novel deftly moves back and forth between present and past, as Toshi explores his unhappy childhood, the reasons behind his mother's unexplained abandonment when he was eight years old, and her move to a seaside inn across the peninsula. As the novel draws to a close, tragic events, both public and personal, bring past and present together, revealing the painful truth of Toshi's parents' lives during World War II, and a secret in Toshi's own past that, in the end, gives him the strength and knowledge to confront the future.

1st edition, signed by author. Fine/Fine

Because the Night

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A botched liquor store heist leaves three grisly dead. A hero cop is missing. Nobody could see a pattern in these two stray bits of information–no one except Detective Sergeant Lloyd Hopkins, a brilliant and disturbed L.A. cop with an obsessive desire to protect the innocent. To him they lead to one horrifying conclusion--a killer is on the loose and preying on his city. From the master of L.A. noir comes this beautiful and brutal tale of a cop and a criminal squared off in a life and death struggle.

1st edition; published by The Mysterious Press, New York, 1984; "A Lloyd Hopkins Novel of Suspense." Dust jacket in protective mylar cover; light shelf wear; corners chipped; dark green cloth with silver lettering on spine; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/VG

Behind that Curtain, A Charlie Chan Mystery

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Charlie Chan is in San Francisco for one week only – he absolutely must leave on Wednesday's boat to get back to Hawaii, where a new son awaits his return. Never mind that Sir Frederic Bruce, a former Scotland Yard detective he's only just met, but for whom he already has great respect, has been murdered at a dinner party he was attending. Never mind that Sir Frederic was hot on the trail of a fifteen-year-old mystery involving murder and a missing woman. Never mind that Chan catches twice as many clues as the bumbling San Francisco detective put on the case – he must get home to his son. But even Charlie Chan can't resist a challenge from a beautiful, intelligent woman like June Morrow, deputy district attorney and the lawyer in charge of prosecuting Sir Frederic's murder. One more week away from home should be plenty of time to catch a killer…

Published by Grosset & Dunlap, 1928. Dust jacket in protective mylar cover; some shelf wear to edges; small area of front cover rubbed; orange cloth with stylized lettering on cover and spine; small decoration on spine; endpapers slightly foxed from dj flaps. G/G

Bend for Home (Signed 1st edition)

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A funny, direct, lively and moving account of growing up in small-town Ireland. Healy lovingly coaxes his childhood into being until, one day, his elderly mother hands him the coded diary he kept as a teenage tearaway and the uncut past burst in like a blast of raw air.

London: The Harvill Press, 1996; 1st edition; signed by the author; dust jacket and book in very good condition.

Between Wars and Other Poems

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Published by The Gehenna Press, Northampton, Mass., 1965. Limited edition, no. 293/500. Drawings by Leonard Baskin. Dust jacket in protective cover; spine and eges tanned; 1/2" at head of spine chipped away; covers lightly soiled; green cloth with gilt lettering on spine; binding tight; text clean and bright; page from The Massachusetts Review, volume 1, no. 2, February 1960, containing two poems by author laid in. VG/G

Blue Highways: A Journey into America (Signed 1st edition)

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Hailed as a masterpiece of American travel writing, Blue Highways is an unforgettable journey along our nation's backroads.

William Least Heat-Moon set out with little more than the need to put home behind him and a sense of curiosity about "those little towns that get on the map -- if they get on at all -- only because some cartographer has a blank space to fill: Remote, Oregon; Simplicity, Virginia; New Freedom, Pennsylvania; New Hope, Tennessee; Why, Arizona; Whynot, Mississippi."

His adventures, his discoveries, and his recollections of the extraordinary people he encountered along the way amount to a revelation of the true American experience.

1st edition, 5th printing; inscribed by author; dust jacket in protective cover; edges worn and creased; cover soiled; corners chipped; blue cloth; edges faded. G/G-

Blue: The History of a Color

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A beautifully illustrated visual and cultural history of the color blue throughout the ages

Blue has had a long and topsy-turvy history in the Western world. The ancient Greeks scorned it as ugly and barbaric, but most Americans and Europeans now cite it as their favorite color. In this fascinating history, the renowned medievalist Michel Pastoureau traces the changing meanings of blue from its rare appearance in prehistoric art to its international ubiquity today.

Any history of color is, above all, a social history. Pastoureau investigates how the ever-changing role of blue in society has been reflected in manuscripts, stained glass, heraldry, clothing, paintings, and popular culture. Beginning with the almost total absence of blue from ancient Western art and language, the story moves to medieval Europe. As people began to associate blue with the Virgin Mary, the color became a powerful element in church decoration and symbolism. Blue gained new favor as a royal color in the twelfth century and became a formidable political and military force during the French Revolution. As blue triumphed in the modern era, new shades were created and blue became the color of romance and the blues. Finally, Pastoureau follows blue into contemporary times, when military clothing gave way to the everyday uniform of blue jeans and blue became the universal and unifying color of the Earth as seen from space.

Beautifully illustrated, Blue tells the intriguing story of our favorite color and the cultures that have hated it, loved it, and made it essential to some of our greatest works of art.

-- "Choice"

Booked to Die: A Mystery Introducing Cliff Janeway

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Booked to Die, the first book in John Dunning’s bestselling, award-winning Cliff Janeway series, is “a joy to read for its wealth of inside knowledge about the antiquarian book business and its eccentric traders” (TheNew York Times Book Review).

Denver homicide detective Cliff Janeway may not always play by the book, but he’s an avid collector of rare and first editions. Bobby Westfall is a local bookscout, a gentle and quiet man who has sold enough valuable books to keep himself and his cats fed and housed. When Bobby is murdered, Janeway would like nothing better than to rearrange the suspect’s spine. But the suspect, local lowlife Jackie Newton, is a master at eluding the law, and Janeway’s wrathful brand of off-duty justice costs him his badge.

Turning to his lifelong passion, Janeway opens a small bookshop—all the while searching for evidence to put Newton away. When prized volumes in a highly sought-after collection begin to appear, so do dead bodies. Now Janeway’s life is about to change in profound and shocking ways as he attempts to find out who’s dealing death along with vintage Chandlers and Twains.

“One of the most enjoyable books I’ve read” (The Denver Post), Booked to Die is the first in the Cliff Janeway series. It is “a standout piece of crime fiction…Compelling page-turning stuff” (The Philadelphia Inquirer).

1st edition, 4th printing; dust jacket shows minor wear; small closed tear at top of front cover on flap side; navy cloth over blue boards; lettering on spine in metallic blue; binding good; text clean. G+/G+

Bowen's Court

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Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973) was an Irish-British novelist and short story writer, known for her depictions of life during wartime London. She spent her summers in her family’s country home, Bowens Court, which was built in the 1770's by Henry Cole Bowen and was located in Cork, Ireland. In this personal narrative, originally published in 1942, Bowen weaves together three centuries of Irish history with a chronicle of her family.

New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1964. 2nd edition in scarce dust jacket with photo by Pat English showing Elizabeth Bowen walking on the lawn at Bowen's Court in Ireland. Dust jacket in protective cover; price not clipped; spine edges lightly chipped; rear cover has light soiling near spine and along top edge; navy blue stamped cloth with gilt lettering and design on spine; endpapers clean; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/VG-

Breaks of the Game (Signed 1st edition)

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A New York Times bestseller, David Halberstam's The Breaks of the Game focuses on one grim season (1979-80) in the life of the Bill Walton-led Portland Trail Blazers, a team that only three years before had been NBA champions.


A Pulitzer Prize-winner for his groundbreaking reporting on the Vietnam War, Halberstam wrote more than 20 books, almost all of them bestsellers. His work has stood the test of time and has become the standard by which all journalists measure themselves.The tactile authenticity of Halberstam's knowledge of the basketball world is unrivaled. Yet he is writing here about far more than just basketball. This is a story about a place in our society where power, money, and talent collide and sometimes corrupt, a place where both national obsessions and naked greed are exposed. It's about the influence of big media, the fans and the hype they subsist on, the clash of ethics, the terrible physical demands of modern sports (from drugs to body size), the unreal salaries, the conflicts of race and class, and the consequences of sport converted into mass entertainment and athletes transformed into superstars -- all presented in a way that puts the reader in the room and on the court, and The Breaks of the Game in a league of its own.

1st edition. Signed by author. Dust jacket in protective cover; small creases along top of front cover; one closed tear front spine edge; black cloth over gray paper boards; small area at top of spine and along front edge scuffed; binding tight; text clean and bright. G/G

Burning the Days : Recollection (Signed 1st edition)

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In this brilliant book of recollection, one of America's finest writers re-creates people, places, and events spanning some fifty years, bringing to life an entire era through one man's sensibility. Scenes of love and desire, friendship, ambition, life in foreign cities and New York, are unforgettably rendered here in the unique style for which James Salter is widely admired.

Burning the Days captures a singular life, beginning with a Manhattan boyhood and then, satisfying his father's wishes, graduation from West Point, followed by service in the Air Force as a pilot. In some of the most evocative pages ever written about flying, Salter describes the exhilaration and terror of combat as a fighter pilot in the Korean War, scenes that are balanced by haunting pages of love and a young man's passion for women.

After resigning from the Air Force, Salter begins a second life, becoming a writer in the New York of the 1960s. Soon films beckon. There are vivid portraits of actors, directors, and producers—Polanski, Robert Redford, and others. Here also, more important, are writers who were influential, some by their character, like Irwin Shaw, others because of their taste and knowledge.

Ultimately Burning the Days is an illumination of what it is to be a man, and what it means to become a writer.

Signed first edition in near fine condition.

Carleton E. Watkins: Photographs 1861-1874

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Carleton Watkins (1829–1916) is widely considered the greatest American photographer of the nineteenth century and arguably the most influential artist of his era. He is best known for his pictures of Yosemite Valley and the nearby Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias. Watkins made his first trip to Yosemite Valley and Mariposa Grove in 1861 just as the Civil War was beginning. His photographs of Yosemite were exhibited in New York for the first time in 1862, as news of the Union’s disastrous defeat at Fredericksburg was landing in newspapers and while the Matthew Brady Studio’s horrific photographs of Antietam were on view. Watkins’s work tied the West to Northern cultural traditions and played a key role in pledging the once-wavering West to Union.

Motivated by Watkins’s pictures, Congress would pass legislation, later signed by Abraham Lincoln, that preserved Yosemite as the prototypical “national park,” the first such act of landscape preservation in the world. Watkins’s photographs helped shape America’s idea of the West, and helped make the West a full participant in the nation. His pictures of California, Oregon, and Nevada, as well as modern-day Washington, Utah, and Arizona, not only introduced entire landscapes to America but were important to the development of American business, finance, agriculture, government policy, and science.

1st edition; published by Fraenkel Gallery, in association with Bedford Arts, Publishers, San Francisco. Essay by Peter E. Palmquist; dust jacket has very light scuffing; tan buckram with brown lettering on cover and spine; former owner's signature in ink on ffep; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/VG

Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut's Journeys (Signed 1st edition - scarce!)

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NASA astronaut Michael Collins trained as an experimental test pilot before venturing into space as a vital member of the Gemini 10 and Apollo 11 missions. In Carrying the Fire, his account of his voyages into space and the years of training that led up to them, Collins reveals the human tensions, the physical realities, and the personal emotions surrounding the early years of the space race.

Collins provides readers with an insider's view of the space program and conveys the excitement and wonder of his journey to the moon. As skilled at writing as he is at piloting a spacecraft, Collins explains the clash of personalities at NASA and technical aspects of flight with clear, engaging prose, withholding nothing in his candid assessments of fellow astronauts Neil Armstrong, John Glenn, and Buzz Aldrin, and officials within NASA.

A fascinating memoir of mankind's greatest journey told in familiar, human terms, Carrying the Fire is by turns thrilling, humorous, and thought-provoking, a unique work by a remarkable man.

1st edition. Inscribed by author. Scarce. Foreword by Charles A. Lindbergh. Dust jacket in protective cover; top edges of flaps tanned; spine edges lightly creased; blue cloth with gilt lettering on spine; top edges slightly faded. VG/VG

Catskill Flytier: My Life, Times, and Techniques

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Anglers and flytiers have been after Harry Darbee for years to write a book—a book, one of them requested, "full of memories and hopes, stories and trout talk, with some-thing of that hallowed mist that hovers around the Willowemoc and the Beaverkill." Finally, here it is! Not only does Darbee evoke the full cast of characters who earned for his native rivers their reputation as the cradle of American fly fishing, he also reveals the tricks and techniques that have made him and his wife, Elsie, two of the world's greatest flytiers. In Catskill Flytier, we meet Herman Christian, Edward R. Hewitt, and Roy Steenrod, who passed on the teachings of the legendary Theodore Gordon; the other pros who made their livelihood as flytiers in the Catskill style; the millionaire fishing-club members who became Darbee customers; the poachers who came by night—and some in broad daylight—to take the big trout out of the club waters; the conservationists who fought and are fighting to save the fish.

Signed first edition in DJ protector; dj has some chips along top and bottom edges; light soiling; brown cloth over tan boards; front endpapers lightly foxed; text clean; binding tight. VG/G

Charlie Chan Carries On

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The fifth of the Earl Derr Biggers Charlie Chan books books involves the Honolulu detective in a case of murder that stretches around the world, as members of a tour group are dying, one by one. Charlie's old friend Chief Inspector Duff from Scotland Yard comes to his rescue in this book. Duff is investigating the murder of Hugh Morris Drake, a sweet old man strangled in London's famous and exclusive hotel, Broome's. Drake is with a tour group encircling the globe. While Duff's ship is docked in Honolulu, the detective is shot and wounded by his quarry; though he survives, he is unable to continue with the cruise, and Chan takes his place on the ship to San Francisco, where finally the mystery is solved.

Bobbs-Merrill, 1930, assumed first edition with dj design (signed) by Mary Briggs, a bit tattered at top of spine.  VG/VG

Charlie Wilson's War: The Extraordinary Story of the Largest Covert Operation in History (Signed 1st edition)

$180.00
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The bestselling true story of a Texas congressman’s secret role in the Afghan defeat of Russian invaders is “a tour de force of reporting and writing” (Dan Rather).
 
A New York Times, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times bestseller.
 
Charlie Wilson’s penchant for cocktails and beauty-contest winners was well known, but in the early 1980s, the dilettante congressman quietly conducted one of the most successful covert operations in US history. Using his seat on the House Appropriations Committee, Wilson channeled hundreds of millions of dollars to support a ragged band of Afghan “freedom fighters” in their resistance against Soviet invaders.
 
Weapons were secretly procured and distributed with the help of an outcast CIA operative named Gust Avrakotos, who stretched the agency’s rules to the breaking point. Moving from the back rooms of Washington to secret chambers at Langley, and from arms-dealers’ conventions to the Khyber Pass, Wilson and Avrakotos helped the mujahideen win an unlikely victory against the Russians.

New York: Atlantic Monthly Press, 2003. 1st edition, signed by author; dust jacket in protective mylar cover. F/F

Child of the Century

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Ben Hecht’s critically acclaimed autobiographical memoir offers incomparably pungent evocations of Chicago in the 1910s and 1920s, Hollywood in the 1930s, and New York during the Second World War and after.

1st printing; dust jacket in protective cover; spine creased and rubbed; head of spine chipped with small tears; corners chipped; edges creased and worn; black cloth over green paper; bottom edge worn; endpapers tanned; PON in ink to ffep, also later gift inscription dated 1975; pencil notes from beginning to page 50; binding good. G/G-

Chronicles of Bustos Domecq

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Chronicles of Bustos Domecq is a collection of short fiction that Jorge Luis Borges wrote in collaboration with his fellow Argentinean, the novelist Adolfo Bioy-Casares. Their stories explore the playful, imaginative, and sometimes fantastic relationship between fiction and reality which Borges was to make his hallmark in works such as the famous collection of stories Fictions. His collaborator Casares was a writer, journalist, and translator best known for his science fiction novel The Invention of Morel.

E.P. Dutton & Co., 1976. Co-author Adolfo Bioy-Casares; translated by Norman Thomas DiGiovanni. Dust jacket in protective cover; flap edges tanned; black paper over cloth with silver lettering on spine. Binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/VG

Chrysanthemum and the Sword: Patterns of Japanese Culture

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Essential reading for anyone interested in Japanese culture, this unsurpassed masterwork opens an intriguing window on Japan. Benedict’s World War II–era study paints an illuminating contrast between the culture of Japan and that of the United States. The Chrysanthemum and the Sword is a revealing look at how and why our cultures differ, making it the perfect introduction to Japanese history and customs.

Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company; The Riverside Press, Cambridge. Scarce 1st edition; dust jacket in protective mylar cover; edges worn; green cloth stamped with gilt on cover and spine; front hinge cracked inside; deckled edges; one spot in middle of fore-edge. G/G

Clan of the Cave Bear (1st Ed)

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An all-absorbing journey into man's possible past. Jean M. Auel, a storytelling genius, weaves a compellingly readable saga of human survival; an epic that transcends time and place. It is peopled with rich and complex characters who experience the full range of human emotions. All this makes for total involvement and believability in the light of today. A novel for all time.

Through Jean M. Auel’s magnificent storytelling we are taken back to the dawn of modern humans, and with a girl named Ayla we are swept up in the harsh and beautiful Ice Age world they shared with the ones who called themselves the Clan of the Cave Bear.

1st edition, 1st printing, with pristine dustjacket. 1980, Knopf. Fine.

Claudius the God and His Wife Messalina

$38.00
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In I, Claudius, Robert Graves began the story of the limping, stammering young man who is suddenly thrust onto the throne after the death of Caligula. In Claudius the God, Graves continues the story, detailing Claudius’s thirteen-year reign and his ultimate downfall. Painting the vivid, tumultuous, and decadent society of ancient Rome with spectacular detail, Graves provides a tale that is instructive, compelling, and difficult to put down for both casual readers and students of Roman history.

New York: Harrison Smith and Robert Haas, 1935. 1st edition. Dust jacket in protective cover; 1" missing from head of spine; edges chipped and creased; corners chipped; black cloth with gold medallion on cover and gilt lettering on spine; endpapers tanned; fold-out family tree; binding tight; text clean. G/G-

Collected Impressions

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Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973) was an Irish-British novelist and short story writer. While she is mostly known for her fiction, she also wrote numerous reviews, prefaces, and personal essays throughout her career. The pieces in Collected Impressions capture the breadth and depth of her engagement with literature past and present, ranging as they do from Flaubert and LeFanu to Woolf and Lawrence, with many obscure and illustrious names in between.

London: Longmans Green and Co., 1950. 1st edition. Dust jacket in protective cover; head of spine chipped; rear cover has 2.5" tear 1" from bottom, some scuffing, and a light blue stain stretching the width of the rear jacket 3" from the bottom; blue cloth with gilt lettering on spine; top edge blue; binding tight; text clean and bright. G/G-

Collected Poems by Geoffrey Hill

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Hailed as "the best poet writing in England" (Michael Longley, The Guardian) and "a magnificent poet" (Poetry), Geoffrey Hill has produced powerfully mythic verse that distinguishes him as a contemporary poet in allegiance with the great tradition. Complex yet spare, Hill is a poet of despair and redemption whose work contains some of contemporary poetry's most powerful moments. This collection brings together for the first time the poems appearing in five previous books, including the acclaimed long poem The Mystery of the Charity of Charles Peguy; also here are three hitherto unpublished poems, Hymns to Our Lady of Chartres.

1st hardback trade edition, published by Andre Deutsch, 1986. Dust jacket in protective cover; no tears or creases, very clean; gray cloth with gilt lettering on spine; former owner's name on front pastedown; binding tight; text clean and bright. G+/VG

Cotswold Characters (USED)

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Courting of Susie Brown

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Erskine Caldwell (1903-1987) was an American writer, known for his portrayals of poverty, racism, and social problems in the South. His novels Tobacco Road (1932) and God's Little Acre (1933) won him critical acclaim. He wrote a total of 25 novels, 150 short stories, twelve nonfiction collections, two autobiographies, and two books for young readers. The Courting of Susie Brown, published in 1952, is a collection of short stories, featuring Caldwell's classic Southern characters and humor.

1st edition; dust jacket in protective mylar cover; dj lightly chipped at spine. Green cloth with black lettering on spine; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/G+

Crank In The Corner

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Christopher Bush (1885-1973) was a British mystery writer. Ludovic Travers, his lanky, bespectacled economist turned private eye, has a knack for busting alibis. This 1933 thriller sees Travers on a train speeding through France while solving the murder of two members of his railway compartment.

Published by A.L. Burt Company by arrangement with Wm. Morrow & Co., 1933; no dust jacket; brown cloth with yellow lettering on cover and spine; edges frayed corners bumped; endpapers tanned; front hinge weak; text clean. G

Critical Path (Signed 1st edition)

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R. Buckminster Fuller is regarded as one of the most important figures of the 20th century, renowned for his achievements as an inventor, designer, architect, philosopher, mathematician, and dogged individualist. Perhaps best remembered for the Geodesic Dome and the term "Spaceship Earth," his work and his writings have had a profound impact on modern life and thought.

Critical Path is Fuller's master work--the summing up of a lifetime's thought and concern--as urgent and relevant as it was upon its first publication in 1981. Critical Path details how humanity found itself in its current situation--at the limits of the planet's natural resources and facing political, economic, environmental, and ethical crises.

The crowning achievement of an extraordinary career, Critical Path offers the reader the excitement of understanding the essential dilemmas of our time and how responsible citizens can rise to meet this ultimate challenge to our future.

1st edition, 2nd printing; inscribed by author; dust jacket in protective cover; spine faded; maroon cloth with gilt decoration and lettering on spine; pictorial endpapers; top edge and fore-edge lightly foxed; binding tight; text clean and bright. G+/G

Crome Yellow (1st edition)

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Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963) was an English writer who spent the latter part of his life in the United States. Though best known for Brave New World, he also wrote countless works of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and essays. A humanist, pacifist and satirist, he wrote novels and other works that functioned as critiques of social norms and ideals. Aldous Huxley is often considered a leader of modern thought and one of the most important literary and philosophical voices of the 20th century.

Huxley launched his career as a novelist with this 1921 effort in which a student named Denys spends his holiday in an English country house located in the small town of Crome. Denys encounters many unusual residents, including a girl who quickly steals his heart. Not one of Huxley's major efforts, this is mostly for laughs.

London: Chatto & Windus, 1921; 1st edition; no dust jacket; yellow cloth; spine tanned; paper label with title and author chipped and missing top 1/3; covers soiled; endpapers foxed; deckled edges. G-

Curse in the Colophon (Signed 1st edition)

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Classic bibliomystery by the well-known Bible scholar about a lost Byzantine library. The Curse in the Colophon was Goodspeed's only novel. The author inscribed this copy in 1936 to Jesse H. Shera, well-known librarian and professor at Case Western Reserve University.

Chicago: Willett, Clark & Company, 1935. 1st edition. Inscribed by author. No dust jacket; blue cloth; spine faded; endpapers tanned; binding good; text clean and bright. G

Dark Hazard

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William Riley (W.R.) Burnett (1899-1982) was an American novelist and screenwriter, best known for his crime novel Little Caesar, the film adaptation of which was considered to be the first of the classic American gangster movies. Burnett's characters exist in a world of twilight morality — virtue can come from gangsters and criminals, malice from guardians and protectors. Above all his characters are human and this could be their undoing. Dark Hazard, published in 1933 and made into a movie in 1934, tells the story of Jim Turner, a gambler, and his wife.

New York and London: Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1933. 1st printing. Dust jacket in protective cover; spine edges chipped and creased; edges worn; water stain along top edge of dj; blue cloth with green illustration of greyhound racing dog wrapping around covers and spine; pictorial endpapers; deckled edges; binding good; text clean. G+/G

Day in the Dark and Other Stories

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Elizabeth Bowen was an Irish-British novelist and short story writer, known for her depictions of life during wartime London. A Day in the Dark collects twenty stories, four of which appear here for the first time in a book and one ("Hand in Glove") for the first time in a collection of Bowen's fiction.

London: Jonathan Cape, 1965. 1st edition. Dust jacket in protective cover; spine edges worn; corners chipped; gray cloth with gilt lettering on spine; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/G

Death of a Perfect Wife: A Hamish Macbeth Mystery

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Hamish Macbeth, the laid-back constable of Lochdubh, Scotland, has a new Land Rover to drive and a Highland summer to savor, but as fast as rain rolls in from the loch, his happy life goes to hell in a handbasket. The trouble begins when his beloved Priscilla Halburton-Smythe returns from London . . . with a fiance on her arm. His miseries multiply when clouds of midges (the diabolical Scottish mosquito) descend on the town.

Then a paragon of housewifery named Trixie Thomas moves into Lochdubh with her lapdog husband in tow. The newcomer quickly convinces the local ladies to embrace low-cholesterol meals, ban tobacco, and begin bird-watching. Soon the town's fish-and-chips-loving men are up in arms. Now faced with the trials of his own soul, Macbeth must solve Lochdubh's newest crime-the mysterious poisoning of the perfect wife.

1st edition. Dust jacket in protective mylar cover. VG/VG

Demon Lover and Other Stories

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The Demon Lover and Other Stories by Elizabeth Bowen was first published in Britain in 1945. In 1946, the collection was published in the United States under the title Ivy Gripped the Steps and Other Stories. Without exception, reviewers greeted it enthusiastically, praising it for what was described in the New Yorker as “a completely successful explanation of what war did to the mind and spirit of the English people.” Today, “The Demon Lover” is probably the most anthologized of Bowen’s short stories, and critics claim that it reflects some of Bowen’s greatest strengths as a writer.

London: Jonathan Cape, 1952. First published 1945, First published in the collected edition 1952. Dust jacket in protective cover; spine faded; top edges lightly worn; crease at bottom of front cover; rear cover lightly soiled; dark green cloth with gilt lettering and decorations on spine; decorative endpapers; frontispiece; binding tight; text clean and bright. G/G

Duchess of Bloomsbury Street

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When devoted Anglophile Helene Hanff is invited to London for the English publication of 84, Charing Cross Road—in which she shares two decades of correspondence with Frank Doel, a British bookseller who became a dear friend—she can hardly believe her luck. Frank is no longer alive, but his widow and daughter, along with enthusiastic British fans from all walks of life, embrace Helene as an honored guest. Eager hosts, including a famous actress and a retired colonel, sweep her up in a whirlwind of plays and dinners, trips to Harrod’s, and wild jaunts to their favorite corners of the countryside.

A New Yorker who isn’t afraid to speak her mind, Helene Hanff delivers an outsider’s funny yet fabulous portrait of idiosyncratic Britain at its best. And whether she is walking across the Oxford University courtyard where John Donne used to tread, visiting Windsor Castle, or telling a British barman how to make a real American martini, Helene always wears her heart on her sleeve. The Duchess of Bloomsbury Street is not only a witty account of two different worlds colliding but also a love letter to England and its literary heritage—and a celebration of the written word’s power to sustain us, transport us, and unite us.

1st edition. Dust jacket has evidence of water damage to bottom; spine edges chipped; front flap clipped; red cloth over red paper boards; top edge red; endpapers have British flag; binding tight; text clean and bright. G/G-

Early Stories

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Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973) was an Irish-British novelist and short story writer, known for her fiction about life in wartime London. This book combines two collections of short stories: Encounters (first published in 1923) and Ann Lee's and Other Stories (published in 1926).

New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1951. 1st edition. Dust jacket in protective cover; inside top edges tanned; edges lightly shelf worn; corners lightly chipped; light purple cloth with silver decorations and lettering on spine; front endpapers lightly tanned; deckled edges; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/VG-

Ellen Foster: A Novel

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"Filled with lively humor, compassion, and intimacy."
—Alice Hoffman, The New York Times Book Review


"When I was little I would think of ways to kill my daddy." With that opening sentence we enter the childhood world of one of the most appealing young heroines in contemporary fiction. Her courage, her humor, and her wisdom are unforgettable as she tells her own story with stunning honesty and insight. An Oprah Book Club selection, this powerful novel has become an American classic.

Winner of the American Academy of Arts and Letters' Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction and the Ernest Hemingway Foundation's Citation for Fiction.

Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 1987. 1st edition. Dust jacket in protective cover; top edge lightly creased; tan cloth with white lettering on spine; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/VG

Encounters: Stories

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Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973) was an Irish-British novelist and short story writer, known for her fiction about life during wartime London. This book is the first American edition of her first collection of short stories, originally published in London by Sidgwick & Jackson in 1923.

New York: Boni and Liveright Publishers, [1924]. Dark blue cloth with geometric design and lettering in gilt on cover; edges worn; corners bumped; slight cant to binding; decorative endpapers in red and green foil; deckled edges; rear hinge weak; gutter exposed between pages 144-145; text clean. G

Essays on Art (Signed 1st edition)

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Max Weber was a German sociologist, philosopher, and political economist whose ideas influenced social theory, social research, and the entire discipline of sociology.

New York: William Edwin Rudge, 1916. Very scarce signed first edition, inscribed by the author to Rabbi Samuel M. Segal in 1958.  4to paper covered booklet with illustration on cover and decorative initial letters on each chapter. VG

Eva Trout, or Changing Scenes

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Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973) was an Irish-British novelist and short story writer, known for her depiction of life in wartime London. Eva Trout, Elizabeth Bowen’s last novel, epitomizes her bold exploration of the territory between the comedy of manners and cutting social commentary.

Orphaned at a young age, Eva has found a home of sorts in Worcestershire with her former schoolteacher, Iseult Arbles, and Iseult's husband, Eric. From a safe distance in London, her legal guardian, Constantine, assumes that all's well. But Eva's flighty, romantic nature hasn't entirely clicked with the Arbles household, and Eva is plotting to escape. When she sets out to hock her Jaguar and disappear without a trace, she unwittingly leaves a paper trail for her various custodians–and all kinds of trouble–to follow.

New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1968. 1st edition of Bowen's final novel. Dust jacket in protective cover; price clipped at bottom of front flap; dark green cloth with gilt decorations and lettering on cover and spine; top edge light green; deckled edges; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/VG

Evergreen Review, Volume 3, number 10, November-December 1959: works by Samuel Beckett, Cynthia Ozick, Henry Miller, et al.

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Evergreen Review, Volume 4, Number 11, January-February 1960: works by William S. Burroughs, Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Jean-Paul Sartre, et al.

$70.00
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Evergreen Review, Volume 4, Number 15, November-December 1960: works by LeRoi Jones, Samuel Beckett, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, et al.

$40.00
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Fallen Angel

$75.00
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Marty Holland, born Mary Hauenstein, was an American screenwriter and author of pulp novels. Holland began her career as a typist in Hollywood and wrote several short stories for pulps. Her first novel, Fallen Angel, was published in 1945 and immediately adapted into the 1945 film of the same name.

1st edition; dust jacket in protective mylar cover; dj corners clipped; head and tail of spine chipped; edges worn; small area of front cover rubbed; back cover soiled; orange cloth with dark blue lettering on cover and spine; small areas on pastedowns and endpapers show evidence of scotch tape; small bookseller's stamp in upper corner of front facing endpaper; rough cut paper; text clean and bright. G/G

Father Goose: The Story of Mack Sennett

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Story of motion picture producer and director Mack Sennett. After acting for a time under the direction of D.W. Griffith, Sennett became associated in 1912 with the Keystone Company, where he produced his famous slapstick films known as "Mack Sennett comedies." Fatty Arbuckle and Charlie Chaplin were two of the stars who worked for him.

New York: Covici Friede Publishers, 1934. 1st edition. No dust jacket; green cloth with gilt lettering on cover and spine; very minor shelf wear; bookplate on ffep; frontispiece portrait; deckled edges. G+

Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys : An American Saga (Signed 1st edition)

$95.00
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Chronicles the story of three generations of the Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys, beginning in 1863 with the baptism of John Francis Fitzgerald and closing with the inauguration of John Fitzgerald Kennedy in January 1961. This copy is a scarce first edition (2nd printing) inscribed by the author.

VG with tight binding, minimal wear to edges of cover and DJ, water stain at bottom of DJ spine, minimal yellowing to DJ.


Flowering Plum and the Palace Lady, Interpretations of Chinese Poetry

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1st edition; pristine dust jacket in protective cover. Fine/Fine

For the Time Being - A Christmas Oratorio: And "The Sea and the Mirror"

$145.00
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New York: Random House, 1944. 1st printing.

One Volume contains two of Auden's long poems: "For the Time Being - A Christmas Oratorio" and "The Sea and the Mirror - A Commentary of Shakespeare's The Tempest." Previous owner has laid in "Christmas 1958" poem by Auden.

Dust jacket in protective cover; small tears at head and heel of spine; corners chipped; navy blue paper over white cloth; gilt lettering on spine; endpapers tanned; signature of former owner in ink on pastedown; bleed-through of glue from repair between pages 3-6;  G/G-

For Whom the Bell Tolls (1st edition, 1st printing, with 1st state dust jacket)

$475.00
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In 1937 Ernest Hemingway traveled to Spain to cover the civil war there for the North American Newspaper Alliance. Three years later he completed the greatest novel to emerge from "the good fight," For Whom the Bell Tolls.

The story of Robert Jordan, a young American in the International Brigades attached to an antifascist guerilla unit in the mountains of Spain, it tells of loyalty and courage, love and defeat, and the tragic death of an ideal. In his portrayal of Jordan's love for the beautiful Maria and his superb account of El Sordo's last stand, in his brilliant travesty of La Pasionaria and his unwillingness to believe in blind faith, Hemingway surpasses his achievement in The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms to create a work at once rare and beautiful, strong and brutal, compassionate, moving, and wise. "If the function of a writer is to reveal reality," Maxwell Perkins wrote Hemingway after reading the manuscript, "no one ever so completely performed it." Greater in power, broader in scope, and more intensely emotional than any of the author's previous works, it stands as one of the best war novels of all time.

New York, Charles Scribner's Sons, 1940. First edition, first printing ("A"). Dust jacket first state with no photographer's name; price intact; dj in fair condition with chips and tears; head of spine torn. Original tan cloth with red and black stamped spine; endpapers darkened; previous owner's bookplate on ffep; small stain at top of first 3 free endpapers. Binding tight; text clean. G/G-

Freydis and Gudrid

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Boyer's "documentary novel" tells the story of Freydis and Gudrid, two women joining the Norse migration to Vinland, North America.

Novelty, Ohio: Veritie Press, 1976. 1st edition; signed by author on ffep. Dust jacket in protective cover; top edge lightly creased; blue cloth with gilt decoration and lettering on cover and spine; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/VG

From Those Wonderful Folks Who Gave You Pearl Harbor: Front-line Dispatches from the Advertising War

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Vividly reminiscent of the goings-on at Sterling Cooperthe late nights, the three-martini lunches, the sex on couches, and, of course, the actual work of plugging productsthis is the story of what Madison Avenue was really like in the ’60s. A worldwide bestseller when first published in 1970, this frank, irreverent, and hilarious memoir is a one-of-a-kind cult classic.

1st printing. Edited by Charles Sopkin. Dust jacket in protective cover; gray cloth with yellow lettering on spine; former owner's name stamped on ffep; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/VG

Frontiersmen: A Narrative (Signed)

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The frontiersmen were a remarkable breed of men. They were often rough and illiterate, sometimes brutal and vicious, often seeking an escape in the wilderness of mid-America from crimes committed back east. In the beautiful but deadly country which would one day come to be known as West Virginia, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, more often than not they left their bones to bleach beside forest paths or on the banks of the Ohio River, victims of Indians who claimed the vast virgin territory and strove to turn back the growing tide of whites. These frontiersmen are the subjects of Allan Eckert's dramatic history.

Against the background of such names as George Rogers Clark, Daniel Boone, Arthur St. Clair, Anthony Wayne, Simon Girty and William Henry Harrison, Eckert has recreated the life of one of America's most outstanding heroes, Simon Kenton. Kenton's role in opening the Northwest Territory to settlement more than rivaled that of his friend Daniel Boone. By his eighteenth birthday, Kenton had already won frontier renown as woodsman, fighter and scout. His incredible physical strength and endurance, his great dignity and innate kindness made him the ideal prototype of the frontier hero.

Yet there is another story to The Frontiersmen. It is equally the story of one of history's greatest leaders, whose misfortune was to be born to a doomed cause and a dying race. Tecumseh, the brilliant Shawnee chief, welded together by the sheer force of his intellect and charisma an incredible Indian confederacy that came desperately close to breaking the thrust of the white man's westward expansion. Like Kenton, Tecumseh was the paragon of his people's virtues, and the story of his life, in Allan Eckert's hands, reveals most profoundly the grandeur and the tragedy of the American Indian.

No less importantly, The Frontiersmen is the story of wilderness America itself, its penetration and settlement, and it is Eckert's particular grace to be able to evoke life and meaning from the raw facts of this story. In The Frontiersmen not only do we care about our long-forgotten fathers, we live again with them. Researched for seven years, The Frontiersmen is the first in Mr. Eckert's "The Winning of America" series.

Signed Second Printing in DJ protector, DJ in Very Good condition, some edge rubbing and small paper loss at top corners. VG/VG

Gabriel Tolliver: A Story of Reconstruction

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New York: McClure, Phillips & Co., 1902. 1st edition. No dust jacket; red blind stamped cloth with gilt lettering on cover and spine; edges frayed; corners bumped; evidence of repair to front hinge; inscription to former owner in ink on ffep; t.e.g.; deckled edges; text clean. G-

George Crile: An Autobiography

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Internationally acclaimed as a surgeon and brilliant researcher, particularly in the therapy of shock, Dr. George Crile was one of the dynamic personalities of our time, both in private and professional life. Following his death in 1943, Grace Crile brought together her husband's voluminous autobiographical writings to form this illustrated, two-volume work, adding important sidelights on a distinguished career that included experiences in two wars, travels through Europe and Asia, expeditions to Africa and Alaska, and association with notables in both medical and non-medical fields.

1st edition, inscribed by Grace Crile; 2 volumes; volume 2 has dj in protective mylar cover; dj has many tears, but all text is legible; red cloth with black and gilt decoration on spines; binding tight; text clean and bright.

Giles Goat-Boy or, The Revised New Syllabus

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In this outrageously farcical adventure, hero  George Giles sets out to conquer the terrible  Wescac computer system that threatens to  destroy his community in this brilliant  "fantasy of theology, sociology, and sex" (Time).

1st edition. Dust jacket in protective mylar cover; rear cover stained at top; small sticker affixed to author photo on jacket rear; black cloth; text clean and bright. G/G

God and Man at Yale: The Superstitions of "Academic Freedom"

$350.00
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"For God, for country, and for Yale... in that order," William F. Buckley Jr. wrote as the dedication of his monumental work—a compendium of knowledge that still resonates within the halls of the Ivy League university that tried to cover up its political and religious bias. 

In 1951, a twenty-five-year-old Yale graduate published his first book, which exposed the "extraordinarily irresponsible educational attitude" that prevailed at his alma mater. The book, God and Man at Yale, rocked the academic world and catapulted its young author, William F. Buckley Jr. into the public spotlight. Now, half a century later, read the extraordinary work that began the modern conservative movement.

Chicago: Henry Regnery Company, 1951. 1st edition. Dust jacket in protective cover; 1/4" missing from head of spine; 1" missing from bottom of spine; edges worn; corners chipped; black cloth with gilt lettering on spine; spine head and tail faded from sun in two areas where jacket is torn; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/G-

Great Battles of the World

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American author Stephen Crane began writing early in life, and was already a published author by the age of sixteen. Among Crane's best known works is The Red Badge of Courage, which was influenced by his own experiences in military school and personal contact with Civil-War veterans. Crane died in 1900 at the age twenty-eight of tuberculosis, but had a significant and lasting impact on twentieth-century literature, influencing early modernist writers such as Ernest Hemingway.

Great Battles of the World, published in 1900, is a book in which Crane discusses some of the most famous battles that he researched.

Illustrated by John Sloan. Red cloth, embossed decoration and lettering in gilt and silver on cover; gilt lettering on spine; t.e.g.; small spot on top of fore-edge; hinges weak. G

Great Days

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This 1979 collection of stories by Donald Barthelme features a new mode of writing in which the author abandons all forms of characterization other than dialogue in an attempt to shift and alter reader expectations and perceptions.

1st edition. Dust jacket in protective mylar cover. Fine/Fine

Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread (1st edition)

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Don Robertson was a true Clevelander. He was born and raised in Cleveland, and after stints in the Army and one year at Harvard, he returned to Cleveland and attended Case Western Reserve University for one year. He then became a reporter and columnist for The Plain Dealer (1950-1955 and 1963-1966), The Cleveland News (1957–1959), and The Cleveland Press (1968–1982). He wrote 18 published novels, most of which took place in Cleveland and the fictional town of Paradise Falls, Ohio. Robertson is probably best known for his trio of novels featuring Morris Bird III: The Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread (1965), The Sum and Total of Now (1966), and The Greatest Thing That Almost Happened (1970). Set in Cleveland between 1944 and 1953, each of the three novels revolves around a major event in the city’s history: the East Ohio Gas explosion, the Indians winning the pennant, and the Korean War. Reviewers compared the trilogy to the works of Mark Twain, Booth Tarkington and J. D. Salinger.

The first of the Morris Bird III trilogy, The Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread, takes place on a quiet autumn afternoon in 1944, when nine-year-old Morris Bird III decides to visit a friend who lives on the other side of town. He grabs the handle of his red wagon and, with his little sister in tow, begins an incredible pilgrimage across Cleveland . . . and out of childhood forever. Set against the backdrop of one of the worst industrial disasters in American history, Don Robertson's enduring, beloved masterwork is a remarkable story of destiny, bravery, and responsibility.

1st edition; dust jacket in protective cover; edges chipped and creased; head of spine has 1" piece missing from top; red cloth with black image of wagon embossed on front bottom; endpapers lightly tanned; former owner's name in pencil on ffep. G/G-

Greatest Thing That Almost Happened (Signed 1st edition)

$75.00
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Don Robertson was a true Clevelander. He was born and raised in Cleveland, and after stints in the Army and one year at Harvard, he returned to Cleveland and attended Case Western Reserve University for one year. He then became a reporter and columnist for The Plain Dealer (1950-1955 and 1963-1966), The Cleveland News (1957–1959), and The Cleveland Press (1968–1982). He wrote 18 published novels, most of which took place in Cleveland and the fictional town of Paradise Falls, Ohio. Robertson is probably best known for his trio of novels featuring Morris Bird III: The Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread (1965), The Sum and Total of Now (1966), and The Greatest Thing That Almost Happened (1970). Set in Cleveland between 1944 and 1953, each of the three novels revolves around a major event in the city’s history: the East Ohio Gas explosion, the Indians winning the pennant, and the Korean War. Reviewers compared the trilogy to the works of Mark Twain, Booth Tarkington and J. D. Salinger.

The Greatest Thing That Almost Happened concludes the story of Morris Bird III. Now, at seventeen, he's on the verge of adulthood . . . and he's fallen in love. It's 1952 and the Korean War hangs over his head like a dangling sword, and his prickly, complicated relationship with his cold and silent father has never been satisfactorily resolved. When Morris's own mortality stares him in the face, he learns what it truly means to become a man.

Signed first edition; dust jacket in protective cover; light creasing along bottom of rear cover; flaps scotch-taped to endpapers; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/G+

Greatest Thing That Almost Happened (Signed 1st edition)

$85.00
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Don Robertson was a true Clevelander. He was born and raised in Cleveland, and after stints in the Army and one year at Harvard, he returned to Cleveland and attended Case Western Reserve University for one year. He then became a reporter and columnist for The Plain Dealer (1950-1955 and 1963-1966), The Cleveland News (1957–1959), and The Cleveland Press (1968–1982). He wrote 18 published novels, most of which took place in Cleveland and the fictional town of Paradise Falls, Ohio. Robertson is probably best known for his trio of novels featuring Morris Bird III: The Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread (1965), The Sum and Total of Now (1966), and The Greatest Thing That Almost Happened (1970). Set in Cleveland between 1944 and 1953, each of the three novels revolves around a major event in the city’s history: the East Ohio Gas explosion, the Indians winning the pennant, and the Korean War. Reviewers compared the trilogy to the works of Mark Twain, Booth Tarkington and J. D. Salinger.

The Greatest Thing That Almost Happened concludes the story of Morris Bird III. Now, at seventeen, he's on the verge of adulthood . . . and he's fallen in love. It's 1952 and the Korean War hangs over his head like a dangling sword, and his prickly, complicated relationship with his cold and silent father has never been satisfactorily resolved. When Morris's own mortality stares him in the face, he learns what it truly means to become a man.


Signed first edition; dust jacket in protective cover; head of spine has small tear at top; edges chipped and tanned; some creases; red cloth over green boards; binding tight; text clean. VG/G

Greyfriars Bobby

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In real life, Greyfriar's Bobby was a Skye terrier who was made famous in 19th century Scotland for sitting on his master's grave for many years. He became so well known that the Edinburgh authorities built a statue of him. Atkinson's heartwarming 1912 novel is told from the point of view of the dog.

New York and London: Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1912. First American Edition. Gray-blue cloth with gilt-encircled image of dog on cover; lettering in white, outlined in black, on cover; gilt lettering on spine; no dj; spine worn; covers lightly soiled; front hinge weak; frontispiece with tissue guard; text clean and bright. G

Gulag: A History

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The Gulag--the vast array of Soviet concentration camps--was a system of repression and punishment whose rationalized evil and institutionalized inhumanity were rivaled only by the Holocaust.
The Gulag entered the world's historical consciousness in 1972, with the publication of Alexander Solzhenitsyn's epic oral history of the Soviet camps, "The Gulag Archipelago." Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, dozens of memoirs and new studies covering aspects of that system have been published in Russia and the West. Using these new resources as well as her own original historical research, Anne Applebaum has now undertaken, for the first time, a fully documented history of the Soviet camp system, from its origins in the Russian Revolution to its collapse in the era of glasnost. It is an epic feat of investigation and moral reckoning that places the Gulag where it belongs: at the center of our understanding of the troubled history of the twentieth century.
Anne Applebaum first lays out the chronological history of the camps and the logic behind their creation, enlargement, and maintenance. The Gulag was first put in place in 1918 after the Russian Revolution. In 1929, Stalin personally decided to expand the camp system, both to use forced labor to accelerate Soviet industrialization and to exploit the natural resources of the country's barely habitable far northern regions. By the end of the 1930s, labor camps could be found in all twelve of the Soviet Union's time zones. The system continued to expand throughout the war years, reaching its height only in the early 1950s. From 1929 until the death of Stalin in 1953, some 18 million people passed through this massive system. Of these 18 million, it is estimated that 4.5 million never returned.
But the Gulag was not just an economic institution. It also became, over time, a country within a country, almost a separate civilization, with its own laws, customs, literature, folklore, slang, and morality. Topic by topic, Anne Applebaum also examines how life was lived within this shadow country: how prisoners worked, how they ate, where they lived, how they died, how they survived. She examines their guards and their jailers, the horrors of transportation in empty cattle cars, the strange nature of Soviet arrests and trials, the impact of World War II, the relations between different national and religious groups, and the escapes, as well as the extraordinary rebellions that took place in the 1950s. She concludes by examining the disturbing question why the Gulag has remained relatively obscure, in the historical memory of both the former Soviet Union and the West.
"Gulag: A History" will immediately be recognized as a landmark work of historical scholarship and an indelible contribution to the complex, ongoing, necessary quest for truth.

Gutter in the Sky

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From the cover: "This is not the first time that thieves, murders, smugglers, pimps and whores have invested the pages of a novel. What makes this book unusual is that in it the underworld moves into literature as a legitimate segment of our society. Characters such as Divine, Mimosa, Darling and Gabriel have, hitherto, always appeared in the wrong, under a shadow which completely cut off their humanity from ours. With the publication of THE GUTTER IN THE SKY - the fastest selling book in Europe today - they appear justified in their own light. Chiefly because their author - who stepped out of a lifetime of imprisonment into international literary fame - is one of them and loves them as they are. Genet loves his extravert and intravert, sex-normal and sex-perverted criminals as much as Victor Hugo loved his saints. In the works of Genet the gutter suddenly appears before us in the full bloom of its natural colors."

Philadelphia: Andre Levy, 1955. Dust jacket in protective cover; edges lightly creased; gray cloth with gilt decoration on cover and spine; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/G+

Halo in Brass: A Paul Pine Mystery

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It started as a routine case for Paul Pine, just a job for a friend, the job of finding Laura Fremont, a girl who went to Chicago from Lincoln, Nebraska, and stopped writing her parents. But even before he left the land of the cornhuskers, Pine had been knocked cold and was involved in a murder.

1st edition; dust jacket in protective mylar cover; bottom inside corner of front cover missing; edges shelf worn and chipped; red cloth with gold lettering on cover and spine; water damage to inside rear cover. G-/G-

Harold and Maude (1st edition)

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Nineteen-year-old Harold Chasen is obsessed with death. He fakes suicides to shock his self-obsessed mother, drives a hearse, and attends funerals of complete strangers. Seventy-nine-year-old Maude Chardin, on the other hand, adores life. She liberates trees from city sidewalks and transplants them to the forest, paints smiles on the faces of church statues, and "borrows" cars to remind their owners that life is fleeting-here today, gone tomorrow! A chance meeting between the two turns into a madcap, whirlwind romance, and Harold learns that life is worth living, and how to play the banjo. Harold and Maude started as Colin Higgins's master's thesis at UCLA Film School. He was working as a pool boy when Paramount purchased the script. The 1971 film, directed by Hal Ashby, bombed. But then this quirky, dark comedy began being shown on college campuses and at midnight-movie theaters, and it gained a loyal cult following. In 1997 it was selected for inclusion on the National Film Registry at the Library of Congress. This novelization was published shortly after the film's release. Even fans who have seen the movie dozens of times will find this companion valuable, as it gives fresh elements to watch for and answers many of the film's unresolved questions. Colin Higgins was a screenwriter, director, and producer of films that included Harold and Maude, Silver Streak, 9 to 5, and The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas. He died in 1988.

First edition; dust jacket in protective cover; no tears; one very small crease at top corner of front flap; off-white cloth with red flower design on front cover and red lettering on spine; red endpapers; former owner name on ffep. VG/VG

Harriet Tubman

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The Associated Publishers, 1943; green cloth scuffed, light internal staining.  Library markings otherwise.  Good-

Harv (Signed 1st edition)

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Don Robertson was a true Clevelander. He was born and raised in Cleveland, and after stints in the Army and one year at Harvard, he returned to Cleveland and attended Case Western Reserve University for one year. He then became a reporter and columnist for The Plain Dealer (1950-1955 and 1963-1966), The Cleveland News (1957–1959), and The Cleveland Press (1968–1982). He wrote 18 published novels, most of which took place in Cleveland and the fictional town of Paradise Falls, Ohio. Robertson is probably best known for his trio of novels featuring Morris Bird III: The Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread (1965), The Sum and Total of Now (1966), and The Greatest Thing That Almost Happened (1970).


Although Robertson declares on his title page that Harv is a novel, its first chapter admits that the book is a loose collection of stories. In 40 anecdotes Harv describes the progress of his life from toilet training at age two to the blindness which forces him to return to diapers at age 65. In the meantime, he proposes to a prostitute who befriends him, falls into the grave at a funeral, saves kittens from freezing, and eventually marries the childhood girlfriend who knocked out two of his teeth. Harv frequently combines bawdy humor with nostalgia and tenderness. [Library Journal, 1985]

Cleveland: John T. Zubal, Inc. Publishers, 1985. Signed by author. F/F

Heat of the Day

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Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973) was an Irish-British novelist and short story writer, known for her depictions of life during wartime. In The Heat of the Day, Elizabeth Bowen brilliantly recreates the tense and dangerous atmosphere of London during the bombing raids of World War II. Many people have fled the city, and those who stayed behind find themselves thrown together in an odd intimacy born of crisis. Stella Rodney is one of those who chose to stay. But for her, the sense of impending catastrophe becomes acutely personal when she discovers that her lover, Robert, is suspected of selling secrets to the enemy, and that the man who is following him wants Stella herself as the price of his silence. Caught between these two men, not sure whom to believe, Stella finds her world crumbling as she learns how little we can truly know of those around us.

1st edition, second impression; no dj; small scuffed area on front cover; slight cant to binding; former owner's name on ffep; text clean. G

Hell's Angels: The Strange and Terrible Saga of the Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs

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Gonzo journalist and literary roustabout Hunter S. Thompson flies with the angels—Hell’s Angels, that is—in this short work of nonfiction.
 
“California, Labor Day weekend . . . early, with ocean fog still in the streets, outlaw motorcyclists wearing chains, shades and greasy Levis roll out from damp garages, all-night diners and cast-off one-night pads in Frisco, Hollywood, Berdoo and East Oakland, heading for the Monterey peninsula, north of Big Sur. . . The Menace is loose again.”
 
Thus begins Hunter S. Thompson’s vivid account of his experiences with California’s most notorious motorcycle gang, the Hell’s Angels. In the mid-1960s, Thompson spent almost two years living with the controversial Angels, cycling up and down the coast, reveling in the anarchic spirit of their clan, and, as befits their name, raising hell. His book successfully captures a singular moment in American history, when the biker lifestyle was first defined, and when such countercultural movements were electrifying and horrifying America. Thompson, the creator of Gonzo journalism, writes with his usual bravado, energy, and brutal honesty, and with a nuanced and incisive eye; as The New Yorker pointed out, “For all its uninhibited and sardonic humor, Thompson’s book is a thoughtful piece of work.” As illuminating now as when originally published in 1967, Hell’s Angels is a gripping portrait, and the best account we have of the truth behind an American legend.

First paperback edition. Very minimal chipping on lower edge of front cover and midway up back cover. VG

Herbert Huncke Reader

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Herbert Huncke's most enduring contribution to the Beat Generation was not his use of drugs or his easy attitude toward the law. What most captivated the Beats was his extraordinary ability to relate his life story in pared-down, unaffected prose. It inspired them to create a new type of literature, free of constraint and self-consciousness. Huncke's work is a vital part of Beat literature, but until now it has remained relatively unknown. The Herbert Huncke Reader includes the full texts of Huncke's long-out-of-print classics Huncke's Journal and The Evening Sun Turned Crimson, excerpts from his autobiography, Guilty of Everything, and a wide selection from his unpublished letters and diaries.

Hercules, My Shipmate

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The author of I, Claudius puts his own twist on the myth of the Argonauts’ quest for the Golden Fleece: “A tour de force . . . A richly tapestried epic” (Kirkus Reviews).
 
An inventive reimagining of the story of Jason and the Argonauts, this novel by renowned poet and classicist Robert Graves brings heroic figures of Hellenistic myth to life. Graves’s Jason is belligerent, energetic, and full of life, and the society Graves builds for him is outlandish and deeply invested in ancient cults.
 
Against this primitive, religious backdrop, the charismatic Jason assembles a crew and sets out to retrieve the sacred gold-trimmed fleece that is sacred to Zeus, and that has been stolen by worshippers of the Triple Goddess. Accompanying him is Hercules, a brave warrior known more for his brawn, and his astonishingly good luck, than his brains. Robert Graves builds a compelling world that sets Hellenistic magic and mystery in a surprisingly gritty, realistic setting, a fascinating read for fans of Greek mythology.
 
“A witty historical novel with much insider’s lore on cult and ritual.” —The New York Review of Books
 
“Richly readable, thoroughly classical yet individually interpreted, this is a labor of love important to students, culture-seekers and readers.” —Library Journal

New York: Creative Age Press, 1945. 1st edition. Dust jacket in protective cover; head of spine missing 1/2"; closed 2" vertical tear repaired on the inside with tape; edges creased and worn; corners bumped and chipped; tan cloth with turquoise and gilt on cover and spine; cover soiled; maps on endpapers; library stamp on ffep and rear pastedown; binding good; text clean. G/G-

Here Let Us Feast: A Book of Banquets

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The celebrated author of such books as The Art of Eating, The Cooking of Provincial France, and With Bold Knife and Fork, Fisher knows how to prepare a feast of reading as no other. Excerpting descriptions of bountiful meals from classic works of British and American literature, Fisher weaves them into a profound discussion of feasting.

She also traces gluttony through the Old and New Testaments of the Bible, and claims that the story of a nation's life is charted by its gastronomy. M.F.K. Fisher has arranged everything perfectly, and the result is a succession of unforgettable courses that will entice the most reluctant epicure.

Viking Press, 1946. 1st edition. No dust jacket; blue cloth with gilt lettering on cover and spine; spine faded and scuffed; corners bumped; remnants of scotch tape on pastedown and ffep. G

High Sierra

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William Riley (W.R.) Burnett (1899-1982) was an American novelist and screenwriter, best known for his crime novel Little Caesar, the film adaptation of which was considered to be the first of the classic American gangster movies. Burnett's characters exist in a world of twilight morality — virtue can come from gangsters and criminals, malice from guardians and protectors. Above all his characters are human and this could be their undoing. High Sierra, published in 1940 and made into a movie in 1941 starring Ida Lupino and Humphrey Bogart, tells the story of notorious criminal "Mad Dog" Roy Earle.

1st edition; gorgeous dust jacket with drawing by Bob Smith; dj in protective mylar cover; 1" tear at head of spine; spine creased; edges and corners shelfworn; orange cloth with blue decoration and lettering on cover and spine; edges darkened; covers lightly soiled; endpapers foxed; text clean. G-/G- 

Hollywood and LeVine

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A trip to the West Coast lands Jack LeVine in a tangled Hollywood murder web
After nearly a decade of churning out hits, Warner Bros. screenwriter Walter Adrian wants a raise on his weekly $2,500 salary. He thinks a thousand dollars more is fair—but the studio’s counteroffer is low, and dropping fast. Something is wrong, and he thinks it may have to do with communism. Though he insists he isn’t a Red, Adrian has no way of proving it. He flees to New York to ask the advice of high school buddy Jack LeVine, private eye. LeVine is broke, and has no sympathy for his wealthy friend, but he agrees to fly West to investigate his old classmate’s trouble. When he arrives, Adrian hangs dead from the gallows at the Western set on the Warners’ backlot. Behind his friend’s death LeVine finds a shadowy Cold War conspiracy, and a city far darker than anything Hollywood puts on screen.

1st edition; dust jacket in protective mylar cover; price clipped; minor shelf wear to spine and bottom front edge; red boards with white cloth spine, black lettering on spine; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/VG

Horses I Have Known

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Fourteen short stories capture the quirky and peculiar behavior of horses, both good and ornery. You'll meet buckers, tricksters, and trusted partners: Bearcat is not just a plain crazy hardheaded bucker...but a wise, coolheaded cross between a whirlwind and a ton of brick, Joker is full of old nick and plenty of snorts, and Little Eagle is the seeing eye for a blind cowboy. First published in 1940, Horses I Have Known contains some of Will James' most acclaimed short stories.

World Publishing; Forum Books Edition, 1st printing, 1945; dj protected; top and bottom of spine chipped; top edge chipped; covers lightly soiled and tanned; red cloth with black lettering; water damage to bottom of spine and spine edges of covers; the red color from cloth binding has stained inside bottom of spine of dust jacket; binding good; text clean; illustrated by author. G/G

Hotel Splendide

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Best known as the author/illustrator of the Madeline books, Ludwig Bemelmans worked in top hotels such as the Ritz during his younger years. This collection of autobiographical stories depicts Bemelmans' life at the Hotel Splendide -- a thinly disguised version of the Ritz Hotel.

New York: The Viking Press, 1941. 1st edition. Dust jacket in protective mylar cover; two light creases on front cover near text edge; head of spine and top corner slightly chipped; gray cloth stamped in blue; all edges orange; pictorial endpapers; illustrated throughout by the author; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/VG-

How It Was (Signed 1st edition)

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From the dust jacket: "The vibrant, spirited woman who was married to Ernest Hemingway for fifteen years now gives us the whole story of her life, and of their life, in a book whose concreteness and immediacy make us know--make us understand--how it was. She gives us the person she was: her Huck Finn childhood, growing up in a sunny clapboard house in a small Minnesota town, summering on lakes and rivers with her handsome, iconoclastic, adored father...her years as a reporter (in Chicago, working for the toughest woman's-page editor in the business; in London, for Lord Beaverbrook; in Paris, for Time)...her brief marriage to an Australian newspaperman... Her first glimpse of Hemingway (she's at lunch with Irwin Shaw. Ernest ambles over: "Introduce to me to your friend, Shaw"). And two short meetings later: "I don't know you, Mary. But I want to marry you." ...Their first days in Paris. Mary enthralled by him, yet nervous, "feeling the heat of his exuberance melting my identity away"...Their first fight (Marlene Dietrich pleads for him: "He is good. He is responsible. He's a fascinating man. You could have a good life, better than being a reporter.") ...Their marriage in Cuba...The Finca where they lived their "own special crazy good life" (guests in endless relays, feasts, the halcyon days fishing aboard their beloved Pilar, nonstop talk, nonstop daiquiris)...Their compromises and quarrels and lovings... Ernest at the race track, showering Mary's baffled, puritanical mother with his winnings...Mary, helping as best she could through the turmoils that marked the writings of ACROSS THE RIVER AND INTO THE TREES, THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA, and A MOVABLE FEAST...."

1st edition; inscribed by author; dust jacket in protective cover; edges tanned; black cloth; pictorial endpapers; binding tight; text clean and bright. G+/G+

I Love You I Love You I Love You

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While better known as the author and illustrator of the Madeline books for children, Ludwig Bemelmans also wrote for adults. This collection of quirky, semi-autobiographical stories about travel, life, and love, is illustrated by the author.

New York: The Viking Press, 1942. 1st edition. Illustrated throughout by the author. Dust jacket in protective mylar cover; price clipped; head of spine and top corners chipped; spine faded; yellow cloth stamped in pink; top edge pink; pictorial endpapers; endpapers tanned; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG-/VG-

Iconologia

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Baskin's illustrated essays are his homage to the artists for whom he feels not only kinship but a deep and singular dedication. These are his companions, his exemplars in the lonely agony of creation, and each portrait seemingly imbues him with the attributes of his subject. Written in a style as complex and idiosyncratic as his art, the essays offer Baskin's insights into the spirit and passion of figures from Rembrandt to Eakins, Anne Allen to Paula Modersohn Becker. Though technical details, biographical facts, and quotes from authorities are included, the book is an intense and essentially personal celebration of creativity at times so strangely religious that it might best be described as a book of devotions. Paula Frosch, Metropolitan Museum Lib., New York (Library Journal, 1988)

1st U.S. edition; dust jacket lightly soiled; spine lightly faded; red cloth with gilt lettering on front cover and spine; edges slightly faded; binding tight; text clean and bright. VG/G+

In Our Terribleness (Some Elements and Meaning in Black Style)

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Amiri Baraka was a poet and co-founder of the Black Arts Movement in the 1960's. He collaborated with photographer Fundi (Billy Abernathy) to create In Our Terribleness, a poetic-photographic essay that "both re-creates and defines black life for the black reader" (New York Times, February 14, 1971). This unique book combines elements of poetry, photography, and art. As Ron Welborn wrote in the New York Times, "Couched in the language of the streets and intoned with the rhythms of jazz, it is both an expression and evocation of the rudiments of blackness."

Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, Inc., 1970. Imamu Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones) and Fundi (Billy Abernathy). 1st printing. Dust jacket in protective mylar cover; creased with several tears, some repaired with scotch tape; 1/2" at head of spine missing; corners worn; black cloth with silver lettering on spine; bottom corners bumped; gift inscription facing page 5; all elements intact, including mirror on page 5; text clean and bright. Scarce. G+/G-

Iron Man

$150.00
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William Riley (W.R.) Burnett (1899-1982) was an American novelist and screenwriter, best known for his crime novel Little Caesar, the film adaptation of which was considered to be the first of the classic American gangster movies. Burnett's characters exist in a world of twilight morality — virtue can come from gangsters and criminals, malice from guardians and protectors. Above all his characters are human and this could be their undoing.

Iron Man features tough fighter Coke Mason. He’s got a great left hook, and he can take the punishment. His manager George Regan knows all his strengths and weaknesses—hell, they’ve known each other since they were kids--and uses them to his advantage to get Coke fired up before every fight. Coke is headed for the top. But he’s got one weakness that Regan can’t use—Coke’s love for Rose, his manipulative wife. Rose has Coke twisted around her finger so tight, Coke can’t see straight. But that doesn’t bother Coke. Whatever Rose wants is okay with him. Until suave hustler Paul Lewis enters the scene, with a proposition of his own.

1st printing, published by The Dial Press, New York, 1930; powerful dust jacket by Edna Reindel; dj in protective mylar cover; spine and corners chipped; top edges of dj foxed; blue boards with gilt lettering on spine; spine faded; top front corner has small water stain; inscription on front free endpaper; binding tight; text clean and bright. G/G-

It Walks By Night

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John Dickson Carr's first novel is a brooding locked room mystery that takes place in Paris. In the smoke-wreathed gloom of a Parisian salon, Inspector Bencolin has summoned his allies to discuss a peculiar case. A would-be murderer, imprisoned for his attempt to kill his wife, has escaped and is known to have visited a plastic surgeon. His whereabouts remain a mystery, though with his former wife poised to marry another, Bencolin predicts his return. Sure enough, the Inspector's worst suspicions are realized when the beheaded body of the new suitor is discovered in a locked room of the salon, with no apparent exit. Bencolin sets off into the Parisian night to unravel the dumbfounding mystery and track down the sadistic killer.

1st edition; no dj; amateur repair to ffep. G-

Jackpot: The Short Stories of Erskine Caldwell

$55.00
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Erskine Caldwell (1903-1987) was an American writer, known for his portrayals of poverty, racism, and social problems in the South. His novels Tobacco Road (1932) and God's Little Acre (1933) won him critical acclaim. He wrote a total of 25 novels, 150 short stories, twelve nonfiction collections, two autobiographies, and two books for young readers. Jackpot is a collection of 75 of Erskine Caldwell's best stories, featuring his genius, humour, earthy characters, and the intimate feel of the landscape of the American South.

1st edition; dust jacket in protective mylar cover; corners clipped; top of spine torn; small tears on back cover and back flap repaired with yellowed scotch tape. Dark blue cloth with silver lettering on cover and spine; endpapers browned; gutter torn at title page. G/G-

James Dean: A Biography

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The first book-length biography of James Dean to appear after his death, written by a friend (and former UCLA classmate). Issued simultaneously in both paperback and hardcover. This is the Ballantine Books vintage paperback, 1956, in good condition.